Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly – Blog Tour Review.

About The Book

Daisy Clayton’s killer was never caught. In over ten years, there has been no breakthrough in her murder case.

Detective Renée Ballard has faced everything the LAPD’s notorious dusk-till-dawn graveyard shift has thrown at her. But, until tonight, she’d never met Harry Bosch – an ex-homicide detective consumed by this case.

Soon, she too will become obsessed by the murder of Daisy Clayton.

Because Ballard and Bosch both know: every murder tells a story. And Daisy’s case file reads like the first chapter in an untold tragedy that is still being written – one that could end with Ballard herself, if she cannot bring the truth to light.

My Review

With thanks to the publisher for the copy received. This is the first book I have read by Michael Connelly, there are quite a few to catch up on if I ever have a dent in my reading. From what I can gather the series featuring Bosch is a lot longer than the one featuring Ballard.

The cold case involving the murder of Daisy is the one that brings both of his characters together. Two different types of police officer, Bosch is now a reserve, and they are also from different generations, have different methods but they get on well and are working as a team.

Both of the characters narrate and it was Ballard’s story I preferred. If I had known more about Bosch’s character and previous cases my feelings could have differed. But Ballard intrigued me, obviously dedicated to her job, more than capable but banished to the ‘late show’.

Whilst they are intent on finding out what happened to Daisy they both had other investigations. Bosch was looking at gang related crimes and Ballard had a variety of call outs that she had to deal with. I found this really interesting and it’s not something I have come across before. It showed how the police officer’s shift changed constantly, how much they relied on their team and how many cases they had to deal with at the same time.

Towards the end I started to see a different side to Bosch, a more sinister one. Because I haven’t read any of the earlier books I’m not sure if it how he works or whether emotions were affecting his approach.

I will, one day, read the earlier books to find out.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.